IFR in the Wild

Just a quick little post here to shine the light on those hardworking guys over at Sprint.com who have just launched a new business site that relies heavily on Inman Flash Replacement. Both France and Aaron have released extensive write ups on the process and Aaron even goes so far as to provide a breakdown of the actual dollar amount saved by using IFR. They did a great job overcoming some of its limitations and provide an invaluable resource for those trying to convince the higher-ups of benefits of the technique.

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Author
Shaun Inman
Posted
June 21st, 2004 at 7:47 am
Categories
CSS
Flash
Inman Flash Replacement
JavaScript
Web
Comments
014 (Now closed)

014 Comments

001

Good to see IFR hitting the web like drop shadows and pinstripes! :p

I am actually using IFR in a few new projects I am working on. It’s so easy to implement, yet it creates such a dramatic effect on the site, it’s awesome!

Author
Michael Simmons
Posted
Jun 21st, 2004 5:50 am
002

Yeah, I’m using it on my new design for Flash Satay technique to make sure my pages are totally valid XHTML. Yes, I know the validator doesn’t check markup that’s written by JavaScript but the browser still has to render it and if you’re putting so much effort ensuring that the rest of your markup validates why stop there?

I also fiddled with the way that it handles the CSS selector so that it’s easier to read and understand.

Author
Ric
Posted
Jun 21st, 2004 6:01 am
003

Shaun, I’ve just used this on a clients site - underground. Its such a timesaver, thanks!

Author
Jon Hicks
Posted
Jun 21st, 2004 6:55 am
004

Michael: Let me know when you use it. Don’t know if I told you but I love the new-ish Thought Anomalies.

Ric: I’m not sure what you changed in the script but it no longer works in Safari (1.2.2). The replacement is occurring (when I right click I get the limited Flash copy/cut/paste menu) but the Flash movies are empty. Works fine in Firefox 0.8

Jon: Nice! I remember you mentioning that you had something in the pipeline that was going to use it.

Author
Shaun Inman
Posted
Jun 21st, 2004 7:26 am
005

Thanks for that Shaun, that’s what you get for not having a Mac I guess. I wonder why it’s not working in Safari, the code’s the same as the one on ALA.

This is probably the only example where something works in Win/IE and not in Safari. Had to happen eventually.

Author
Ric
Posted
Jun 21st, 2004 7:42 am
006

Shaun… thanks for the mention. You linked to us (France and I) before we even had a chance to send you an announcement of them being published… you are magic in more ways then one. =)

It was very fun (and vexing) getting it all to work in the confines of our standards but it is working out great for us. So thanks yet again, and hope you don’t mind the extreme liberties I took in rewriting just about everything. It definitely couldn’t have been done without your inspiration, both in the concept and the initial script I picked apart.

Author
Aaron
Posted
Jun 21st, 2004 8:10 am
007

All the of the great stuff that Sprint is doing almost makes me guilty about switching my cell service to T-Mobile this year. Can’t beat $4.99 a month unlimited data though…

I mentioned in one of Shaun’s earlier IFR posts that I’d eventually be providing a scalable version of the .fla so you can use IFR and employ scalable headlines as we do on ESPN. That file can now be found here. It is simply Shaun’s original .fla with a few lines of code added to frame 1 which reduce the size of your headline if the text is too long to fit in the rectangular area you have specified. I call it sIFR… or scalable Inman Flash Replacement.

The file can be either scalable or non-scalable depending on your wishes. It defaults to non-scalable, but just pass in “scalable=true” using Shaun’s handy-dandy javascript and the text will magically resize itself.

Here is the actionscript in case anyone’s interested:

Stage.scaleMode="noscale";
Stage.showMenu=false;
orig_width = Stage.width;
txtF._alpha = 0;
txtF.text=txt;
if (scalable == "true") {
    txtF.autoSize = "left";
    if (txtF._width >= orig_width) {
        scale = 100*(orig_width/txtF._width);
        txtF._xscale = scale;
        txtF._yscale = scale;
    }
}
txtF._x=0;
txtF._y=Stage.height-txtF._height-2;
txtF._alpha = 100;
Author
Mike D.
Posted
Jun 21st, 2004 9:27 am
008

Aaron; hehe, of course I am. After reading how much you guys saved using IFR I might be bothered to add a PayPal donation button whenever I share something like this ;D

Mike: Awesome, thanks for sharing. I’m happy to mirror that .fla if you don’t mind. I’ll include it in my next write up on IFR too.

Author
Shaun Inman
Posted
Jun 21st, 2004 11:43 am
009

Shaun. Of course, mirror away! I’m very close to having multi-line functionality working satisfactorily as well. So ideally, the .fla will have three modes: scalable, wrapable, and none.

Unfortunately there will be a sometimes perceptible shift in HTML content when a headline wraps, but hey, I can live with that.

Author
Mike D.
Posted
Jun 21st, 2004 1:29 pm
010

You guys are changing the face of the internet, you realize this right? I think this IFR stuff has the potential to explode — especially based on the initial uses by businesses like Sprint. Time for you to start writing a book, Shaun. You may not be able to cash out with the application of IFM itself, but at least earn your keep by teaching others how to implement it.

Author
Sean Sperte
Posted
Jun 21st, 2004 3:56 pm
011

I don’t know if I could write an entire book on IFR.

Then again, it’s not like there’s just one flavor of it. The single line version will be fine for some. The extended characters required by the Sprint team resulted in sacrificing other less used characters—but who’s to say that approach will fit other’s needs. And like ESPN.com, some will prefer the scaling option.

I don’t know, even then that’s only 3 chapters. I’d need to find more things to replace. Besides I’m not sure it’s relevant enough to survive the time it would take from pen-to-publish. A simpler, more efficient technique will have evolved or been developed in a completely different direction by the time such a book hit the streets.

Author
Shaun Inman
Posted
Jun 21st, 2004 4:35 pm
012

Christoph posted my site in the “favelets” post but I really have to thank you personally. IFR was a lifesaver indeed.

I do have a little problem I have no idea on going about fixing it: If you look at my site, the category link (css & standards) is supposed to be just above the horizontal line but the IFR somehow causes it to bump up a few pixels.

The categories are wrapped in a float:right div. Any ideas on how to fix this?

Author
zulkamal
Posted
Jun 21st, 2004 6:09 pm
013

shauninman.com/mentary/past/ifr_revisit … evised.php

Every time I click on that link, my browser crashes. I’m running Mozilla 1.6 on windows XP

I’ve tried 6 or 7 times and it’s crashed every one of them.

Author
Chris Joseph
Posted
Jun 22nd, 2004 3:15 pm
014

That’s just too much of a good thing Chris. That page has 100+ occurances of IFR—far more than I ever intended or recommend appear on one page. I never expected any of my posts to receive the number of humbling comments that they have. Sorry for the trouble.

Author
Shaun Inman
Posted
Jun 22nd, 2004 3:22 pm